Tag Soviet Union

What the Soviet Story Teaches Us about Sincerity

Ellen Rutten— Concerns about sincere expression matter hard today. Social media and e-services are transforming the meaning of trust – in both bad ways (online frauds, hacker interventions) and good (when that cut-rate Airbnb apartment turns out to be as homely and lovely as you expected). Spin doctors and fake news makers

Continue reading…

Unveiling a Bribery Culture in the Soviet Union

James Heinzen— I first became fascinated with the social and cultural dimensions of everyday bribery in the Soviet Union when I was robbed in Moscow in 1992, just after the collapse of the USSR.  My wallet was swiped by a group of kids while I was walking in central Moscow. When

Continue reading…

Angry Birds: Russian Censorship of the Arts

Janice Ross— “Ballerinas dance anti-Putin Swan Lake in Odessa.”  The headline sounds like a set-up for a sketch comedy routine but it was deadly earnest. This past May, four Ukranian ballerinas donned tutus and pointe shoes and interlaced arms to dance the four little swans quartet from Swan Lake as

Continue reading…

The Moral Spark That Ended the Soviet Empire

December 25 is an important date for millions of Christians around the world who mark Christmas Day and the birth of Jesus Christ, but the early morning hours of December 25, 1991 also marked Mikhail Gorbachev’s resignation as president of the Soviet Union (which would be officially dissolved the next

Continue reading…

Eminent Biography: Joshua Rubenstein on Leon Trotsky

For our latest “Eminent Biography” installment, Joshua Rubenstein reflects on his writing of the tumultuous political career of Leon Trotsky: A Revolutionary’s Life, the latest in Yale University Press’s Jewish Lives series. Often remembered as persecutor turned persecuted, Leon Trotsky was a central figure in the global political drama between

Continue reading…

In Memoriam: Lt. Gen. William E. Odom

The recent passing of retired senior military official and former Yale professor William Odom has given many the chance to reflect on his life of service and scholarship. In his work with the Carter and Reagan administrations, Odom maintained a hard-line stance on the Soviet Union, a nation that had

Continue reading…

Leading specialist lauds Foxbats over Dimona

Writing for the Middle East Journal, Mark N. Katz favorably reviewed Foxbats over Dimona: The Soviets’ Nuclear Gamble in the Six-Day War by Isabella Ginor and Gideon Remez. Professor Katz, an expert on Moscow’s foreign policy toward the Middle East, was blown away by the book’s compelling argument and unique

Continue reading…

Yale Press Awarded $1.3 Million Grant from Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Yale University Press is pleased to announce that it has received a $1.3 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to develop a digital documentary edition of Stalin’s Personal Archive. The digitization of Stalin’s Personal Archive is a new initiative of Yale University Press’s acclaimed Annals of Communism series,

Continue reading…

Remembering the Six-Day War: 40 years later

June 5, 1967 marks the 40th anniversary of the Six Year War, the start of an armed conflict between Israel and the Arab states, Egypt, Syria and Jordan. Fearing an imminent invasion, Israel launched a preemptive air attack on Egypt in June 1967 and it achieved such staggering devastation that

Continue reading…

“It’s like the Dead Sea Scrolls for the Stalin period”

As the headline states, the landmark series Annals of Communism is once again making news as a key resource for scholars of the Soviet Union. Jonathan Brent, editorial director for Yale University Press, discusses a exciting new project in an article featured in Sunday’s New York Times Book Review. “The

Continue reading…

  • 1 2