Author Interviews

William H. Gerdts on Two Centuries of American Still-Life Painting

As many who are attentive to art world goings-on are aware, collectors Frank and Michelle Hevrdejs recently promised to the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, a trove of spectacular still lifes by American artists; the works span the years from 1817 to 2012.  A book on the collection, Two Centuries

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James S. Ackerman: Origins, Invention, Revision

On the last day of 2016, we lost one of the world’s foremost architectural historians when James Sloss Ackerman died at age 97.  Ackerman was a consummate, and widely esteemed, academic, whose rigorous method set architecture in the broader contexts of cultural and intellectual history. He was  a Fellow of

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Cuba Libre: Art in Tumultuous Times; Interview with Abigail McEwen by David Ebony

David Ebony– Revolutionary Horizons: Art and Polemics in 1950s Cuba, a new book by University of Maryland professor and Latin American art scholar Abigail McEwen, could hardly have appeared at a more opportune moment. Cuba is everywhere in the news lately. President Barack Obama’s visit to Cuba last March, the

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The Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization: An Interview with Felix Posen

The Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization will be a ten-volume collection of 3,000 years of Jewish literature, artwork, and artifacts. We sat down with Felix Posen, who conceived the project, to ask about his hopes for the anthology, his perspective on secularism, and his thoughts on technology and preservation.

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The Ceaseless Curiosity of Alberto Manguel: An Interview with the Reader

What drives us to learn? How do books help us understand the world? How does language fail us? We sat down with reader and writer Alberto Manguel to satisfy our, well, curiosity. Yale University Press: How much do your personal experiences affect what you write about? Alberto Manguel: I’m not a scholar,

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How did the Ten Commandments become THE Ten Commandments?

Disturbed by the role the Bible, and particularly the Ten Commandments, have played in political and cultural debates, Biblical scholar Michael Coogan set out to trace the history of the text of the Decalogue. Coogan explains that the Bible is not an unchanging text, and understanding how it developed throughout history

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Translating Place In Literature: An interview with Rodrigo Rey Rosa

We are pleased to release a new interview with Rodrigo Rey Rosa, author of Severina and The African Shore, both available to the English speaking world through Yale University Press’s Margellos World Republic of Letters series. In the interview, Rey Rosa talks about his writing and about the intricacies of

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An Interview with Jody Gladding, translator of Rimbaud the Son

We are delighted to release an interview with Jody Gladding, translator (with Elizabeth Deshays) of Pierre Michon’s Rimbaud the Son, now available through the Margellos World Republic of Letters series.  In the interview, Gladding discusses Michon’s groundbreaking book and addresses questions of translation. Yale University Press: Although Rimbaud the Son

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Eugene O’Neill: A Life in Four Acts

Four seems to be Eugene O’Neill’s lucky number. He was the recipient of four Pulitzer Prizes for Drama, the most won by any single playwright. His most famous play, Long Day’s Journey Into Night, was written in four acts. Robert Dowling’s new biography Eugene O’Neill: A Life in Four Acts, forthcoming this October continues

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What can the Nobelman case tell us about the next financial crisis?

  Follow @jentaub To address the 2008 financial crisis, congress passed the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) to bailout out the banks and the federal government committed trillions of dollars to save the entire system. Fed chairman Ben Bernanke defended the massive government intervention to rescue the banks.  He said, “it wasn’t

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