Ancient History

Who Was Vespasian?

Today is Roman Emperor Vespasian’s birthday. And while he may not be as famous as some of predecessors, Julius Caesar or Augustus, for example, his Flavian Dynasty would rule the Empire for nearly thirty years. And the vast construction projects enacted during this time would see the creation of some of Rome’s most

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Why Augustus Should Be Remembered Alongside Julius Caesar

Adrian Goldsworthy— Maybe sometimes a person can be too successful, or at least you are tempted to wonder this when you think about how Augustus is scarcely remembered these days. We have all heard of Julius Caesar, and we have all heard of Antony and Cleopatra—in each case their names

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Adrian Goldsworthy Documents the Lives of the Greatest Romans: Caesar, Antony, and now Augustus

Adrian Goldsworthy, an award-winning biographer and historian, has brought ancient Rome to life through a trilogy of biographies of the leaders of the greatest empire of all time. In Caesar: Life of a Colossus and Antony and Cleopatra, Goldsworthy cut through the traditional stories told of these well-known figures, exposing the complexity

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The Most Famous Roman Ever to Have Lived

See all 20% off titles in our YUP Backlist History promotion! In a key moment of Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, the titular character famously declares: I could be well moved, if I were as you; If I could pray to move, prayers would move me; But I am constant as the

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The Benefits of Charity

However we conceive its definition, the act of charity is alive and well in American culture. Last year alone, Americans donated an estimated $316.23 billion to charitable causes. While many disagree on the best way to give or the places one’s time and money should go, it is an ancient practice

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Beneath Biblical Lands

There was a time when historians would have to accept some details of the past as great unknowns. Without the ability to go back in time, recording and relating history will always pose difficulties. But each year, more and more of these oppositions are being removed. Today, modern archaeological research

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Jacob: A Story of Crime, Punishment, and the Birth of Nation

How do you write a biography with only one source of information? Such is the challenge for Yair Zakovitch, author of Jacob: Unexpected Patriarch,who takes on the role of biblical biographer and, consequently, literary archaeologist. Rather than dig deep in the earth for clues of the past, Zakovitch dives into

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The Games are Open; Now, Open a Book

Today begins full-fledged Olympic fever, placing London at the center of spirited rivalry and international attention. There is a romantic quality to the Olympic Games: countries putting aside their wars and politics and grudges to come together in the name of sportsmanship and tradition.  And as these Games of the

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London 2012: Ancient Olympic Boxing, A Sickening Spectacle

Were the ancient Olympic Games anything like the competitions we know today? Neil Faulkner’s A Visitor’s Guide to the Ancient Olympics transports us to the games of 388 B.C., providing a lively guided tour of the ancient Greek Olympics and bringing to life the sights and sounds (and smells) of the competition—which were

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London Olympics 2012: Whose Games Are They Anyway?

Neil Faulkner is the author of A Visitor’s Guide to the Ancient Olympics, now available from Yale University Press. With only 30 days left before the Opening Ceremony of the 2012 Olympic Games,  we thought to share some insight into the side of the Games you won’t see, even those as

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