Art & Architecture

James S. Ackerman: Origins, Invention, Revision

On the last day of 2016, we lost one of the world’s foremost architectural historians when James Sloss Ackerman died at age 97.  Ackerman was a consummate, and widely esteemed, academic, whose rigorous method set architecture in the broader contexts of cultural and intellectual history. He was  a Fellow of

Continue reading…

0

Cuba Libre: Art in Tumultuous Times; Interview with Abigail McEwen by David Ebony

David Ebony– Revolutionary Horizons: Art and Polemics in 1950s Cuba, a new book by University of Maryland professor and Latin American art scholar Abigail McEwen, could hardly have appeared at a more opportune moment. Cuba is everywhere in the news lately. President Barack Obama’s visit to Cuba last March, the

Continue reading…

0

How The Nutcracker Can Help Heal Post-Election America

Jennifer Fisher— Heading into the holiday season, many Americans will have tickets for The Nutcracker, or at least they will be considering which of the twelve nearby versions to see. The ballet features a Christmas party, children having fun, and candy dances, so why not? At the same time, in

Continue reading…

0

Podcast: Paris’s Centre Pompidou

January 31st, 2017 marks the 40th anniversary of the opening of the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the revolutionary building designed by Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers. The building launched the careers of these two Pritzker Prize-winning architects and is today one of the world’s most popular cultural institutions and the

Continue reading…

0

Artistic innovation meets activist politics in early 20th-century Mexico

Matthew Affron and Mark A. Castro– Paint the Revolution: Mexican Modernism, 1910-1950, an exhibition that focuses on an extraordinary moment in the history of modern art, opened in October at the Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA). The show is the product of a partnership between the PMA and the Museo del

Continue reading…

0

Open letter to Président François Hollande Concerning the Current State of the Centre Pompidou

Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers’s iconic Centre Pompidou in Paris will celebrate its 40th anniversary in January 2017. Francesco Dal Co, author of our newly published book on the building, penned an open letter to President Hollande calling for the restoration of the Parisian landmark, parts of which are now

Continue reading…

0

Designing the Indecipherable: The Voynich Manuscript

Peter M. Blaiwas — The Absolutely Unique Challenges of Publishing the Voynich Manuscript Fascsimile Book In 2014, Yale University Press approached Wordesign Services to copyedit, design, and produce a facsimile edition of the Voynich Manuscript, a very old, mysterious, beautifully illustrated text. The book would include the first full-size reproduction

Continue reading…

0

Alexander McQueen: Deliverance

Robert Fairer— The Spring/Summer 2004 Deliverance show was, for me and for many others, a uniquely memorable Alexander McQueen accomplishment.  It expressed breathtaking contradictions: a combination of the classic and the modern; a coexistence of Lee’s singular, visionary genius with the organizing structure of a well-known Hollywood movie.  It was dazzling; it invented a

Continue reading…

0

Real and Magical—diane arbus: in the beginning with Jeff L. Rosenheim and Karan Rinaldo

Rachel High– Diane Arbus (1923–1971) is one of the most distinctive and provocative artists of the 20th century. Her photographs of children and eccentrics, couples and circus performers, female impersonators and nudists, are among the most recognizable images of our time. diane arbus: in the beginning is the definitive study

Continue reading…

0

The Artful Religion of William Blake

Leo Damrosch— Religion was profoundly important to Blake, in a questing and questioning way that is thought-provoking even for readers and viewers who are not religious at all. One of his first experiments in relief etching was a little pamphlet entitled All Religions Are One, which asserts that however much

Continue reading…

0