What SUP from Your Favorite University Presses, December 6, 2013

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Welcome to our weekly roundup of news from university presses! There is much to share from our fellow academic publishing houses and much to learn on What SUP at the social university presses. This week we found university presses discussing Veteran’s Day, everyday ethnography, and Chinese filmmaker Wang Renmei! What did you read this week?

Several university presses are commemorating the passing of Nelson Mandela: Oxford University Press has published two posts celebrating Mandela’s achievements and examining his legacy as a global icon; meanwhile, Duke University Press presents an excerpt from Mandela’s 1964 “Statement from the Dock” speech that he gave to the court before his conviction on charges of sabotage and treason.

In honor of Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day tomorrow, December 7th, John Hopkins University Press shares a guest post from Indiana University history professor John Bodar about his reflections on Pearl Harbor and how its memory is re-imagined today in the age of global terrorism.

Harvard University Press wonders about the future of shopping in light of news that Amazon plans in the near future to deliver packages within 30 minutes using drones. While on the one hand online shopping is becoming increasingly ubiquitous, the push to support independent bookstores and small business (e.g. Small Business Saturday) is also gaining steam.

NYU Press presents a podcast interview with Josh Lambert on his new book that explores American Jews’ struggle with obscenity limitations and censorship in their participation in the production, distribution, and support of sexually explicit literary, theatrical, and comedic work.

Uptown at Fordham University Press, writer Cynthia Meyers looks at the evolving landscape of advertising and the re-emergence of “advertainment” in today’s commercials, most notably Target, in which actors from film or television advertise a product while in character.

Columbia University Press ponders on the Westernization of Chinese food with the increasing presence of Coca-Cola and McDonald’s and presents an excerpt from the book The Land of the Five Flavors: A Cultural History of Chinese Cuisine.

Over at Penn State University Press, author Sarah Horowitz highlights the lifelong friendship of Pierre Jean de Béranger and Jacques Antoine Manuel, two formerly famous French national political figures of the nineteenth century. This segment is from a book that focuses on the cultural as well as political history of post-Revolutionary France to illuminate how French society responded to and recovered from the French Revolution.

University of Chicago Press shares an excerpt from the book From the Score to the Stage, an illustrated history of Continental opera production and staging. The excerpt traces the development of Mozart’s commissioned work Idomeneo, re di Creta at the Munich Residenztheater in 1871.

And lastly, enter a new writing challenge over at Wesleyan University Press! Submit an original poem to be performed aloud by a group of people and potentially win a copy of Annie Finch’s new book, Spells: New and Selected Poems. For more information, visit the WesPress Blog here.

 

2 comments on “What SUP from Your Favorite University Presses, December 6, 2013

  1. Do you have to be a Yale graduate or student to receive this newsletter? I would love to be able to get an edition sent to me weekly if that is possible. Please let me know

    • Yale University Press says:

      Hi Byron,

      Thanks for your interest! There isn’t a newsletter for What SUP specifically, but if you enter your email address in the box on the right, that will subscribe you to all our Yale Press Log posts, including What SUP on Fridays. And no, you don’t need to be affiliated with Yale to subscribe.

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