Recent Posts

The Globalization of the Industrial and Financial Revolutions in the 19th Century

Meghnad Desai— The second half of the nineteenth century witnessed one of the many episodes of globalization. This one was built on the industrial and financial revolutions. The new inventions in transport and communications – railroads, steamships and the introduction of the telegraph – had connected the many parts of

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Analyzing Word Choice for Translating Foreign Languages

Alex Zucker— Translating Tomáš Zmeškal’s Love Letter in Cuneiform was a joy, to be honest, because of his sense of humor and the play and playfulness within the text itself. One example of this that also demonstrates how literary translation is not simply a reproduction in English of the original

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Hitler’s Generals: The Origins of Complicity

Ben H. Shepherd— For decades after the Second World War, the German army of the Third Reich retained an image as an oasis of decency amid the depravities of the Nazi regime. Yet the reality, which studies of recent decades have conclusively demonstrated, was that the army was deeply implicated,

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The Struggle to Define Strong Sustainability

Dieter Helm— The trouble with strong sustainability is that it contains very little by way of guidance as to what we should do, except ‘preserve everything’. It is in essence the claim that natural capital should be regarded as non-substitutable, and hence, following Eric Neumayer, strong sustainability can be called

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Podcast interview with Joan Marter, editor of Women of Abstract Expressionism

Welcome to our first Yale University Press art+architecture book podcast! We’ve interviewed Joan Marter, Rutgers professor and editor of the recently-published Women of Abstract Expressionism (which accompanies an exhibition currently on view at the Denver Art Museum — it will move this fall to the Mint Museum in Charlotte, North

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The Olympians of Ancient Greece

Neil Faulkner— In the early days, the Olympics seem to have been an informal local festival with only aristocratic contestants. Athletes competed not so much as representatives of their cities – many of which were little more than villages, or at best hilltop strongholds – but on their own accounts,

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“Earning to Give” Leads to Happiness

Peter Singer— In 2013 an article in the Washington Post featured Jason Trigg, an MIT computer science graduate working in finance and giving half of his salary to the Against Malaria Foundation. Trigg was described as part of “an emerging class of young professionals in America and Britain” for whom

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What SUP From Your Favorite University Presses, August 5th 2016

Welcome to our weekly roundup of news from university presses! Once again, there is a lot to share this week from our fellow academic publishing houses and much to learn on What SUP at the social university presses. This week, we found conversations on why many millennials are not speaking

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How Seasoned Earthenware Cooking Pots are Holding Back Women’s Education: Iranian Satire

Ali-Akbar Dehkhoda; Translated by Janet Afary; John R. Perry— I’ve often wondered how it is that, with all the emphasis by prophets and sages and the great men of the world on the need for education of women, when our women have so often assembled and, humbly but insistently, petitioned

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