Recent Posts

A History of Modern South Asia

Ian Talbot— South Asia is of immense significance to the wider world. It is home to a quarter of the global population and a third of the Islamic community. It is a major market and focus for overseas investment within which the rising economic power of India will become increasingly

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Rachmaninoff and Nietzsche?

Rebecca Mitchell— It was common knowledge among his Russian contemporaries that Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943) did not willingly enter into conversation about his music. When commissioned to interview the composer about his musical inspiration in 1915, music critic Grigorii Prokofiev warned the editor of the Russian Musical Newspaper that any such

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The Math of a Coin Flip

Anna Lachowska— In what some are calling “coingate”, Hillary Clinton’s lead over Bernie Sanders in Monday night’s Iowa caucus allegedly came down to a series of coin flips. When the votes tied in several precincts, a coin toss determined which candidate would win the delegates. Exactly how many coin flips

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100 Years after the Discovery of Eugene O’Neill, “Hughie” and “Long Day’s Journey Into Night” Open on Broadway

Hughie begins performances on February 8 at Broadway’s Booth Theatre and Long Day’s Journey Into Night begins performance on March 31 at Broadway’s American Airlines Theatre   Robert M. Dowling— Not long ago, on the 123rd anniversary of Eugene O’Neill’s birth, I attended the Irish American Writers and Artists organization’s

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Money and Politics in Polarized Times

Richard L. Hasen— Solving one problem with money in politics can create another. Consider, for example, a law which limits to $100 the amount any donor can give a candidate. A state might enact this limit to prevent politicians from being corrupted by big donors.  But candidates facing such low

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The Relationship between Law and Economics

Guido Calabresi— A century and a half ago John Stuart Mill said of English philosopher and political radical Jeremy Bentham, in effect, that he approached the world as a stranger. And, if the world did not fit his theory, utilitarianism, he dismissed what the world did as nonsense. Mill then said

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What SUP From Your Favorite University Presses, January 15th, 2016

Welcome to our weekly roundup of news from university presses! Once again, there is a lot to share this week from our fellow academic publishing houses and much to learn on What SUP at the social university presses. This week, we found conversations on Black Power in the 1970s, the

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Proust’s Lasting Appeal

William C. Carter— A question I am often asked is why do I never tire of reading Proust’s In Search of Lost Time? How does this novel continue to speak to generation after generation in a voice that seems fresh and vigorous? How does Proust manage to breathe so much

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Eat Poop and Live

Susan L. Perkins and Rob DeSalle— Though it might sound very unappetizing, many animals eat their own feces (or poop). For example, rabbits do it to help them to break down grasses, which are difficut to digest. Unlike cows and their relatives that chew a regurgitated “cud” of grass, rabbits

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