Recent Posts

On Corita Kent and the Language of Pop

Corita Kent and the Language of Pop is an exhibition opening this Thursday, September 3rd, at the Harvard Art Museums.  The Boston Globe recently published a piece in which Cate McQuaid whimsically proposes that if Don Draper and Mother Teresa had a love child, it would be Corita Kent.  The

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A Conversation with Clive James

In August 2015 Yale published Latest Readings, by the celebrated memoirist, poet, translator, critic and broadcaster Clive James. As he contemplates life and mortality, James muses that “if you don’t know the exact moment when the lights will go out, you might as well read until they do.” We spoke to Clive James

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Slavery in Arabia, Demand in the West

Matthew S. Hopper— Last month, path-breaking investigative journalism—most prominently Ian Urbina’s “Outlaw Ocean” series in The New York Times—exposed tragic connections between global consumer demand and contemporary slavery. These investigations revealed how men and boys across Southeast Asia have been coerced, captured, or sold into slavery or harsh, slave-like conditions aboard

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What SUP From Your Favorite University Presses, August 28th, 2015

Welcome to our weekly roundup of news from university presses! Once again, there is a lot to share this week from our fellow academic publishing houses and much to learn on What SUP at the social university presses. This week, we found conversations on both happy and tragic anniversaries, including the

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Why Should We Care about the Census in 2015?

Margo Anderson— In these dog days of summer 2015, the 2016 presidential election campaign is already in full swing. Twenty-two announced candidates (seventeen Republicans and five Democrats) are already filling the airwaves with their pitches, though the first actual delegate selection event, the Iowa Caucuses, is not for another five

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Echoes from a Soundscape Ecologist

Bernie Krause— Nearly twenty years ago, while exploring links between natural soundscapes and music, my dear late father-in-law introduced me to the writings of Paul Shepard. The book, The Others: How Animals Made Us Human, contained a chapter titled “The Gift of Music.” One particular line in that section stood

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Patrick Modiano’s Paris

Mark Polizzotti— The Paris of Patrick Modiano’s fictions is a city that no longer exists, and perhaps never did. There is a character and a topology typical of his version of the city, a peculiar atmosphere (even when the sun is blazing, the streets seem shrouded in gray), an architecture,

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What SUP From Your Favorite University Presses, August 21st, 2015

Welcome to our weekly roundup of news from university presses! Once again, there is a lot to share this week from our fellow academic publishing houses and much to learn on What SUP at the social university presses. This week, we found conversations on Cecil the Lion, the concept of

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Revolutionary Ideas in the Atlantic World

Janet Polasky— The interconnections of today’s global society are inescapable. So why should we imagine that the founding fathers dreamed of freedom in isolation? The Atlantic World had never been as tightly interconnected as at the end of the eighteenth century. Two centuries before the Arab Spring, without electronic social

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